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You spend about one-third of your life at work. So, it’s important that you enjoy it. That doesn’t mean you have to be happy at your job every minute or even every day. But it needs to be something that, way more often than not, you look forward to doing when you wake up in the morning.

Happiness is a state of mind – and ultimately, something you can control. Improving your mood at work – like losing weight, eating healthier, or learning to play an instrument – takes work, practice, and patience. But if you put your mind to it, it can – and will – happen.

Make self-improvement your mantra.

Take charge of your own personal and professional development. Develop a plan and goals for your career and then pursue them. Ask for help from your boss. Seek out assignments that will help you achieve your milestones and build your skillset. Pursue opportunities and connections that you find valuable. When you feel in control of your career, you’re more likely to be satisfied.

  • Find something new to learn – and go for it. Whether it’s completing an online course, vying for a new professional certification, or taking a yoga class after work, do whatever it takes to restore a sense of balance, motivation, and success into your daily routine.
  • Avoid burnout. Take breaks when needed. Research has shown that the human brain can only really focus on a single task for 25 minutes at a time. Weather and work conditions permitting, step outside, and get some fresh air. But at the very least, rest your eyes or step away from what you’re doing periodically, so you can recharge.

Make it about others, as well as yourself.

Get to know, make friends with, and help your coworkers. Feeling understood and valued by even one colleague, especially if it’s someone with whom you interact regularly, can significantly boost your mood at work.

  • Celebrate together. Acknowledge other employees for something good they’ve accomplished. Giving positive feedback will not only help you feel better but will also boost team morale and engagement.
  • Lend a hand to others, even if you’re busy. As noted in a recent Harvard Business Review article, if you help someone for 10 to 30 minutes a day, you’ll actually feel less time-constrained yourself. Helping makes you feel more confident, capable, and ultimately, more efficient and productive.
  • Keep things positive. Avoid negative conversations and gossip. Keep your work friends on the same high road by venting when needed, but otherwise directing conversations onto positive topics.

You don’t have to love every aspect of your job, but it shouldn’t make you miserable on a regular basis. If all else fails, be honest with yourself: you may be stuck in a toxic work culture or a role that’s simply not a good fit for you. If this is the case, consider working with a professional career counselor from PrideStaff Fresno to reevaluate your goals, your current position, or your entire career. Read our related posts or contact us today to learn more.

 

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